ZINC LEVEL

Code
900.5650
Name
ZINC LEVEL
Category
None
Department
Send-Out
Start Date
Expiration Date
Synonyms
Zn
CPT Codes
84630
Site
SBMF
Reference Test
23182
ATLAS Test Code

Specimen Information

Type

SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONS, CALL LAB

Volume

Transport Info

Fasting Required?
False
Patient Instructions

Reference Range

Normal: 700-1200 mg/L

Methodology

Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS)

Clinical Significance

Evaluate nutritional status
Zinc is an essential element; it is a critical cofactor for carbonic anhydrase, alkaline phosphatase, RNA and DNA polymerases, alcohol dehydrogenase, and many other physiologically important proteins. The peptidases, kinases and phosphorylases are most sensitive to zinc depletion. Zinc is a key element required for active wound healing.Zinc depletion occurs because either it is not absorbed from the diet or it is lost after absorption. Dietary deficiency may be due to absence (parenteral nutrition) or because the zinc in the diet is bound to phyate (fiber) and not available for absorption. Once absorbed, the most common route of loss is via exudates from open wounds such as third degree burn or gastrointestinal loss as in colitis. Hepatic cirrhosis causes excess loss of zinc by enhancing renal excretion. Zinc depletion occurs in burn patients who loose zinc in the exudates from their burn sites.Zinc excess is not a major clinical concern. The popular American habit of taking mega-vitamins (containing huge doses of zinc) produces no direct toxicity problems. Much of this zinc passes through the gastrointestinal tract and is excreted in the feces. The excess fraction that is absorbed is excreted in the urine. The only known effect of excessive zinc ingestion relates to the fact that zinc interferes with copper absorption that can lead to hypocupremia.

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