HEPATITIS B SURFACE ANTIGEN CONFIRMATION

Code
900.1802
Name
HEPATITIS B SURFACE ANTIGEN CONFIRMATION
Category
None
Department
Send-Out
Start Date
Expiration Date
Synonyms
HEP BS AG CONF
CPT Codes
87340
Site
SBMF
Reference Test
28183
ATLAS Test Code

Specimen Information

Type

Gold, SST

Volume

1.0 ml

Transport Info

Refrigerated

Fasting Required?
False
Patient Instructions

Reference Range

Non-reactive

Methodology

Chemiluminescent Enzyme Immunoassay

Clinical Significance

Establish HBsAg carrier state
Evaluate Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is the sole human pathogen in the family of hepatitis-associated DNA viruses, and is found worldwide. Distribution of HBV infection will vary among geographical areas and population groups. Transmission of the virus is due to parenteral contact, through the exchange of blood or blood products, sexual contact, and perinatal spread from mother to newborn. Clinical manifestations range from mild asymptomatic infections to severe fulminant hepatitis. Over 90% of infected adults will have an acute self-limiting infection, with jaundice and abnormal liver function. Recovery occurs without any chronic sequelae. Availability of recombinant HBV vaccines, and the recommendation of universal immunization for infants and other high-risk persons has aided in the prevention of HBV infections. In addition, treatment with alpha-interferon to relieve symptoms is available. Results have shown positive response to treatment in 40-50% of selected individuals with chronic active hepatitis B. Classification of a hepatitis B infection requires the identification of several serological markers expressed during three phases (incubation, acute and convalescent) of the infection. The first marker to appear during the incubation phase is HbsAg, and indicates an ongoing infection with HBV. Antibodies to HbsAg generally appear after HbsAg has been cleared from the blood stream, usually 6 months after infection, and its presence represents recovery and immunity. However, in a few patients known to have antibodies to HgsAg, subclinical infections have developed. The presence of HgsAg antibodies should not be used as the sole marker in determining a prior hepatitis B infection.
antigenemia in chronic active and acute hepatitis

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