HERPES SIMPLEX VIRUS TYPE 1 AND 2 GLYCOPROTEIN G-SPECIFIC (HERPESELECT)

Code
900.1953
Name
HERPES SIMPLEX VIRUS TYPE 1 AND 2 GLYCOPROTEIN G-SPECIFIC (HERPESELECT)
Category
None
Department
Send-Out
Start Date
Expiration Date
Synonyms
HSV Type-Specific IgG Antibodies
CPT Codes
86695; 86696
Site
SBMF
Reference Test
28211
ATLAS Test Code

Specimen Information

Type

Gold, SST

Volume

1.0 ml

Transport Info

Centrifuge and immediately transfer serum to separate plastic tube
Refrigerated

Fasting Required?
False
Patient Instructions

Reference Range

See Report

Methodology

Multiplex Flow Immunoassay (MFI)

Clinical Significance

The type-specific EIA (types I and II) is useful in the detection of past infection with HSV type I and type II. Serology is an effective way to diagnose subclinical HSV type II infections and is especially useful in screening pregnant women. Culture is currently the preferred method to diagnosis acute infection with HSV. Serology, however, is useful to diagnosis acute infection when culture material is not available. Measurement of acute and convalescent serum for HSV antibodies is recommended for accurate interpretation of the test. A significant rise or fall in antibody level or seroconversion would indicate an acute infection.

Serology is an effective way to diagnose subclinical HSV type II infections, but currently most available tests are of limited value because they cannot accurately discriminate between HSV-I and HSV-II antibodies. Because herpes virus types I and II share many common antigens, there is considerable cross-reactivity among most type I and type II enzyme immunoassays (EIA) based on whole viral proteins. Western blot (WB) analysis has the ability to distinguish between types I and II antibody and is considered the traditional gold standard for differentiating these antibodies. Due to its cumbersome nature, WB is not a practical option for the clinical laboratory. Recently, type-specific purified glycoproteins G (gG1 and gG2) have been used to develop reliable type-specific immunoassays to detect antibodies to herpes simplex. The EIA used at ARUP is based on these purified glycoproteins, and when compared to WB, had a sensitivity of 95 percent and a specificity of 96 percent for HSV-1, and a sensitivity of 98 percent and a specificity of 97 percent for HSV-2. It is important to note, however, that individuals infected with HSV may not exhibit detectable IgG antibody to glycoprotein G in the early stages of infection and 5-10 percent of infections may occur with glycoprotein G-deficient virus. Detection of antibody presence in these cases may only be possible using a non-type specific screening test.

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