HERPES SIMPLEX VIRUS TYPE NON-SPECIFIC IGG AB WITH REFLEX TO TYPE 1 AND 2 SPECIFIC

Code
000.0000
Name
HERPES SIMPLEX VIRUS TYPE NON-SPECIFIC IGG AB WITH REFLEX TO TYPE 1 AND 2 SPECIFIC
Category
None
Department
Send-Out
Start Date
Expiration Date
Synonyms
HSV IgG Abs, Type Non-Specfic, with Reflex
CPT Codes
86694 If reflexed, add: 86695, 86696
Site
SBMF
Reference Test
28048
ATLAS Test Code

Specimen Information

Type

Gold, SST

Volume

1.0 ml

Transport Info

Refrigerated

Fasting Required?
False
Patient Instructions

Reference Range

See Report

Methodology

Type Non-Specific: Chemiluminescent Enzyme Immunoassay
Type-Specific (If Indicated): Multiplex Flow Immunoassay (MFI)

Clinical Significance

Herpes Simplex virus (HSV) antibody testing can be used to aid in the diagnosis of initial or primary infections due to either Herpes Simplex Type 1 or Type 2 viruses, reinfection or reactivation of latent viruses, and also to determine immunologic status or experience with HSV.

Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV) Type 1 is generally associated with oral infections and other infections above the waist whereas HSV Type 2 is generally associated with genital infections and other infections below the waist. This distinction, however, is not completely specific as either viral type can be associated with either oral or genital infections. Type 1 and Type 2 viruses share many common antigens so antibodies that form in response to one viral type often cross-react with the other. Specific testing for antibodies against one viral type are available but nonspecific type antibody testing can be used as a screening tests and are often less expensive. Testing of paired sera samples for IgG antibodies from 10 day to 2 week intervals can be useful in the detection of active infections including primary, reactivated or recurrent infections. Generally a fourfold or greater increase in IgG titer between acute and convalescent sera indicates recent or active infection. The presence of IgM antibodies to HSV in a single sample also usually reflects an active infection, although not necessarily a primary one. Note: In some patient populations the presence of HSV antibodies (mainly IgG) can be detected in as many as 1/2 to 2/3 of newborn infants due to passive transplacental transfer from the mother. The number of antibody-positive infants then decreases to a very small percentage at 6 months to one year of age. In children, that percentage then gradually increases to 40-70% by age 14 and to even higher percentage in late adulthood. Therefore, a single laboratory result, particularly for IgG antibodies, is often not very meaningful. Other limitations of HSV antibody testing include the report that some individuals fail to develop detectable antibody levels after infection indicating that lack of seroconversion does not exclude the possibility of infection. HSV antibody test should not be used by themselves for the diagnosis of current HSV infection in pregnant women. Also, a rising serum antibody titer is not sufficient for diagnosing HSV encephalitis. However, it should be considered in a presence of high antibody level in cerebrospinal fluid. Testing results on immunocompromised or immunosuppressed patients may be difficult to interpret or even misleading. Patients with positive test for Rheumatoid Factor may exhibit false positive HSV IgM antibody testing.

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