CHLAMYDIA IGG/IGM ANTIBODY

Code
900.1025
Name
CHLAMYDIA IGG/IGM ANTIBODY
Category
None
Department
Send-Out
Start Date
Expiration Date
Synonyms
CPT Codes
86631 X3, 86632 X3
Site
SBMF
Reference Test
44002
ATLAS Test Code

CHLAM IGG IGM

Specimen Information

Type

Gold, SST

Volume

1.0 ml

Transport Info

Label samples as: "acute" or "convalescent" Centrifuge and immediately transfer serum to separate plastic tube Refrigerated (48 hours) or frozen

Fasting Required?
False
Patient Instructions

Reference Range

Chlamydia pneumoniae IgG titer <1:64 Chlamydia psittaci IgG titer <1:64 Chlamydia trachomatis IgG titer <1:64 Chlamydia pneumoniae IgM titer <1:10 Chlamydia psittaci IgM titer <1:10 Chlamydia trachomatis IgM titer <1:10

Methodology

Micro-Immunofluorescent Assay (MIF)

Clinical Significance

The combination of IgG and IgM antibody detection is indicated for testing pneumonia patients as an aid in diagnosing community-acquired penumonia caused by Chlamydia pneumoniae. Chlamydia are intracellular microorganisms that have some features similar to bacteria including susceptibility to antibiotic therapy as well as other features of viruses including the requirement of living cells for multiplication. C. pneumoniae causes pneumonia in humans and is spread from human to human without intermediate hosts. C. psittaci causes a disease characterized by pneumonia, headache, and hepatosplenomegaly. It is acquired by airborne transmission from infected birds. C. trachomatis has been implicated in a variety of diseases including ophthalmic infections, non-gonococcal urethritis and cervicitis, pelvic inflammatory disease in females and epididymitis in males. • Approximately 40% to 60% of adult populations around the world have antibodies to C. pneumonia, which suggests that the infection is extraordinarily prevalent, and re-infection is common. Reported cases of C psittaci infection in the U.S. runs typically less than 50 per year, with 16 cases reported in 1999. Sources of human C. psittaci infection other than infected birds have been identified and may be more common than currently recognized. The prevalence of C. trachomatis infections in adolescent women usually exceeds 10% and in some populations can reach 40%.

Back