EHRLICHIA CHAFFEENSIS IGG/IGM ANTIBODIES BY IFA

Code
000.0000
Name
EHRLICHIA CHAFFEENSIS IGG/IGM ANTIBODIES BY IFA
Category
None
Department
Send-Out
Start Date
Expiration Date
Synonyms
Human Monocytic Ehrlichiosis IgG and IgM Antibodies, HME IgG and IgM Antibodies
CPT Codes
86666 x 2
Site
SBMF
Reference Test
44332
ATLAS Test Code

Specimen Information

Type

Gold, SST

Volume

1.0 ml

Transport Info

Centrifuge and immediately transfer serum to separate plastic tube
Refrigerated

Fasting Required?
False
Patient Instructions

Reference Range

Ehrlichia chaffeensis Antibody, IgG by IFA
< 1:64 Negative-No significant level of Ehrlichia chaffeensis IgG antibody detected.
1:64-1:128 Equivocal-Questionable presence of Ehrlichia chaffeensis IgG antibody detected. Repeat testing in 10-14 days may be helpful.
≥1:256 Positive-Presence of IgG antibody to Ehrlichia chaffeensis detected, suggestive of current or past infection.

Ehrlichia chaffeensis Antibody, IgM by IFA
< 1:16 Negative-No significant level of Ehrlichia chaffeensis IgM antibody detected.
≥ 1:16 Positive-Presence of IgM antibody to Ehrlichia chaffeensis detected, suggestive of current or recent infection.

Methodology

Semi-Quantitative Indirect Fluorescent Antibody (IFA)

Clinical Significance

Seroconversion between acute and convalescent sera is considered strong evidence of recent infection. The best evidence for infection is a significant change (fourfold difference in titer) on two appropriately timed specimens, where both tests are done in the same laboratory at the same time.

While the presence of IgM antibodies suggests current or recent infection, low levels of IgM antibodies may occasionally persist for more than 12 months post-infection. A single IgM result should be interpreted with caution.

Note:
Human ehrlichiosis is a tick-borne disease caused by rickettsial-like agents. Two forms, human monocytic ehrlichiosis (HME) and human granulocytic ehrlichiosis (HGE), have been described. HME is often referred to as "spotless" or rashless Rocky Mountain spotted fever, and has been reported in various regions of the United States. The causative agent of HME has been identified as Ehrlichia chaffeensis. Infected individuals produce specific antibodies to Ehrlichia chaffeensis which can be detected by an immunofluorescent antibody (IFA) test.

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