PARVOVIRUS B19 IGM ANTIBODY

Code
000.0000
Name
PARVOVIRUS B19 IGM ANTIBODY
Category
None
Department
Send-Out
Start Date
Expiration Date
Synonyms
Fifth Disease
CPT Codes
86747
Site
SBMF
Reference Test
28253
ATLAS Test Code

Specimen Information

Type

Gold, SST

Volume

1.0 ml

Transport Info

Refrigerated

Fasting Required?
False
Patient Instructions

Reference Range

Negative: <0.9 IV
Equivocal: 0.9-1.1 IV
Positive: >1.1 IV

Methodology

Enzyme Immunoassay (EIA)

Clinical Significance

Qualitative detection of parvovirus B19 IgM
Parvovirus B19 (B19) is the only known human pathogenic parvovirus. B19 infection has a wide range of disease manifestations depending on the immunologic and hematologic status of the hosts. It causes erythema infectiosum (known as fifth disease or slapped-cheek disease), an innocuous rash illness, in normal and immunocompetent children. Occasionally, fifth disease leads to an acute symmetric polyarthropathy that can mimic rheumatoid arthritis especially in adults. In patients with underlying hemolytic disorders and/or increased erythropoiesis, infections lead to a temporary failure of red blood cell production and transient aplastic crisis. Persistent B19 viremia manifests as pure red cell aplasia and chronic anemia in the immuno-compromised host. The infection can lead to fetal death in utero, hydrops fetalis or congenital anemia in the fetus due to their immature immune system. B19 infection is common in childhood and it occurs in adult life as well. Detectable IgG is found in 50% of children by the age of 15 years and in more than 90% of elderly people. In immunocompetent patients, B19 DNA is only detectable in the first few days of infection. The diagnosis of acute B19 infection is therefore based on detection of IgM. IgM antibody remains detectable 2 to 3 months after infection. IgG usually is present by the seventh day of illness and remains detectable throughout life.

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