STRONGYLOIDES IGG ANTIBODY BY ELISA, SERUM

Code
000.0000
Name
STRONGYLOIDES IGG ANTIBODY BY ELISA, SERUM
Category
None
Department
Send-Out
Start Date
Expiration Date
Synonyms
CPT Codes
86682
Site
SBMF
Reference Test
44247
ATLAS Test Code

Specimen Information

Type

Gold, SST

Volume

1.0 ml

Transport Info

Centrifuge and immediately transfer serum to separate plastic tube
Refrigerated

Fasting Required?
False
Patient Instructions

Reference Range

1.49 IV or less: Negative - No significant level of Strongyloides IgG antibody detected.
1.50-2.10 IV: Equivocal - Questionable presence of Strongyloides IgG antibody detected. Repeat testing in 10-14 days may be helpful.
2.11 IV or greater: Positive- IgG antibodies to Strongyloides detected, which may suggest current or past infection.

Methodology

Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA)

Clinical Significance

Aid in the diagnosis and confirmation of patients in which there is a clinical suspicion of Strongyloides infection. Results for this test should not be used without correlation to clinical history or other data.

Strongyloidiasis is caused by the intestinal nematode, Strongyloides, as it migrates from the skin to the intestines. These nematodes may exist as free-living larvae in warm, moist tropical climates, or as noninfective larvae that pass in the stool of infected individuals and become infective while in the soil of temperate environments. It is suggested that approximately 80 million people may be affected by Strongyloides infections worldwide. Strongyloides larvae enter the body by penetrating the skin and are carried through blood vessels to the lungs. The larvae travel from the lungs to the trachea and the pharynx, where they are swallowed and enter the intestines via the duodenum and upper jejunum. Three areas of involvement have been described in human infection. Cutaneous infections occur as the larvae migrate under the skin and are observed as inflamed tracks across the skin. Migration may be only a few millimeters up to several centimeters per day. More rapid movement of the larvae has been termed "larva currens" (racing larva) to describe larva racing tracks that can progress as fast as 10 cm/hour. These lesions appear quickly and generally disappear within 12-18 hours. Intestinal infections cause mucosal damage that resemble peptic ulcers, with symptoms such as enterocolitis, malabsorption, sepsis due to mucosa damage, hemorrhages, diarrhea, and abdominal pain in the right upper quadrant. Hyperinfections are recognized when long-term autoinfections lead to a state where neither the parasite nor the host suffers any serious damage by the infection. However, if the host becomes immune-compromised, the nematode infection can disseminate. In this state, large numbers of larvae are produced and are found in every tissue of the body, causing extensive damage to the host. Occasionally, these hyperinfections may mimic ulcerative colitis or Crohn disease.

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