ERYTHROPOIETIN

Code
900.1450
Name
ERYTHROPOIETIN
Category
None
Department
Send-Out
Start Date
Expiration Date
Synonyms
EPO
CPT Codes
82668
Site
SBMF
Reference Test
30026
ATLAS Test Code

Specimen Information

Type

Gold, SST

Volume

1.0 ml

Transport Info

Centrifuge and immediately transfer serum to separate plastic tube
Refrigerated

Fasting Required?
False
Patient Instructions

Reference Range

5.0-36.0 mIU/mL

Methodology

Chemiluminescent Immunoassay (CLIA)

Clinical Significance

Erythropoietin (EPO) is a sialoglycoprotein hormone produced primarily by the kidneys. Human EPO has a molecular weight of 30,000-35,000 Daltons and is composed of a 166 amino acid polypeptide containing one O-linked and three N-linked carbohydrate chains. Human urinary EPO is biochemically, functionally and immunologically identical to recombinant human EPO produced by CHO cells. The recombinant protein is a good substitute for the native protein for use in an immunoassay.Erythropoietin plays a major role in regulating erythrocyte production by acting on the bone marrow to stimulate red blood cell production. In many types of anemia, there is an inverse relationship between hemoglobin or hematocrit and serum EPO levels. The steady state concentration of EPO in the serum can provide useful information in the assessment of various anemic and polycythemic conditions. Aplastic anemia, hemolytic anemia, and anemia due to iron deficiency result in an increased level of serum EPO. EPO levels in patients with anemia due to renal failure are usually inappropriately low for the degree of anemia and are most likely caused by impaired ability of the diseased kidney to produce an adequate amount of EPO.Polycythemia vera is a myeloproliferative disorder characterized by an abnormal proliferation of the hematopoietic bone marrow and an increase in the number of red blood cells (erythrocytosis). EPO levels are typically either low or within the normal range. Secondary polycythemia is also characterized by an increase in the total red blood cell mass and occurs as a physiological response to tissue hypoxia. The hypoxia may be due to such factors as pulmonary disease, cardiovascular disease, prolonged exposure to high altitude, and abnormal forms of hemoglobin or drug treatment. Patients with secondary polycythemia usually have elevated EPO levels. In some of these patients, the EPO level may be normal which is possibly due to a higher turnover of the EPO. Elevated levels of EPO may also be caused by renal tumors that produce renal ischemia to EPO secreting cells or they directly secrete excessive EPO.

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